Archive for July, 2013

Iberomedieval Association of North America (IMANA) Call for papers for the 49th International Medieval Congress (Kalamazoo, May 8-11, 2014).

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

The Iberomedieval Association of North America (IMANA) will sponsor four sessions at the Congress next May. If you’d like to submit an abstract for one of these sessions, please fill out the Participant Information Form which you’ll find on the website link below and submit it directly to the session organizer. Be sure to indicate whether or not you’ll need any equipment such as a projector:

http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF

N.B.: Deadline for submission of paper proposals is September 15, 2013. However, the Congress encourages organizers to fill their sessions as soon as possible, so please submit your abstracts promptly. If you wait until the deadline you may find that the session you are interested in is no longer open.

Here is a list of the IMANA sessions and their organizers for 2014:

  • Maritime Miracles in the Medieval Mediterranean (Nico Parmley: parmlenm@whitman.edu)
  • The Converso Diaspora: Rejudaization, Philosophical Polemics, and Visions of Inquisitorial Spain (Gregory Kaplan: gkaplan@utk.edu)
  • Theory and Practice of Leadership: Political, Religious, and Ethnic Leaders and their Communities in Medieval Iberia (Óscar Martín: OSCAR.MARTIN@lehman.cuny.edu)
  • The Virgin Mary: A Woman for Medieval Times in Hispanic Literatures (Lesley Twomey: lesley.twomey@northumbria.ac.uk)
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CFP North American Catalan Society (NACS)

Sunday, July 14th, 2013

Call for Papers

49th International Congress on Medieval Studies

May 8-11, 2014

Western Michigan University

Kalamazoo, MI

DEADLINE: September 15, 2013

North American Catalan Society (NACS) seeks papers for two panels, both co-sponsored with the Ibero-Medieval Association of North America (IMANA), at the 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University, May 8-11, 2014.

Self-Fashioning and Assumptions of Identity in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia (co-sponsored with the Ibero-Medieval Association of North America [IMANA])

In the Middle Ages individuals and groups could define or express identity through a variety of literary and performative practices: the creation of authorial personae, the exercise of patronage, the composition or use of courtesy manuals, the invention (or recovery) of family and community history, editorial practice, passing, professional formation, autobiography, social climbing and mobility, etc. In these and other exercises in the creation and expression of identity, authors and historical actors employ inherited attributes, acquired skills and performed actions to persuade contemporaries (or to dissemble) in ways that illustrate the values and expectations prevalent in their historical context. For this panel, IMANA and NACS seek papers that discuss historical and literary examples (including examples of literary characters) of the definition and expression of identity in cooperation or conflict with the values and expectations of the culture of Iberia and the Mediterranean World in the later middle ages (1200 – 1500 CE).

Translatio: Cultural Exchange in Medieval Iberia (co-sponsored with the Ibero-Medieval Association of North America [IMANA])

A polyglossic space in which several languages coexist (the vernaculars Castilian, Galician/Portuguese, Catalan and Occitan plus Latin, Arabic and Hebrew) and a literary polysystem characterized the dynamic of medieval Iberian culture. Perhaps more so than in other regions of medieval Europe, in Iberia texts, ideas, cultural practices, tools, techniques and persons were subject to translation, to exchange or movement from one cultural context to another. Medieval translators of texts did not usually strive for literality, but often appropriated and transformed their sources to the culture of adoption – “domesticating” the new text, as Lawrence Venuti has described it. The adaptors of ideas, practices, tools and techniques, as well as persons entering new contexts, likewise appropriated or transformed their material for the culture of adoption. For this panel, IMANA and NACS seek papers that explore examples of textual, cultural or personal translation to, from, and within Medieval Iberia (700 – 1500 CE): the translation of texts, the movement of persons from one religion, culture, or community to another, and the exchange of ideas, tools and techniques across cultural and political boundaries are all of interest to us.

Submit an abstract and the completed Congress Participant Information Form (http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF)

by September 15, 2010, to:

John A. Bollweg
314 W. Traube Avenue
Westmont, IL 60559

E-mail: trecento@comcast.net
Phone: 630-390-6172

Mens et Mensa: Society for the Study of Food in the Middle Ages

Sunday, July 14th, 2013

Call for Papers

49th International Congress on Medieval Studies

May 8-11, 2014

Western Michigan University

Kalamazoo, MI

DEADLINE: September 15, 2013

Mens et Mensa: Society for the Study of Food in the Middle Ages, an association of scholars of medieval intellectual, literary and social history that encourages cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural scholarship on the ideas, practices and artifacts concerning food, seeks papers for one panel at the 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University, May 8-11, 2014.

Prescriptions for Well-Being: Food, Bodily Health and Spiritual Health in the Middle Ages

Medieval physicians recognized food and diet as contributors to healthy and diseased complexions or temperaments, while the doctors of the Church understood abstinence and gluttony to affect spiritual health. Medical and culinary practices were similarly intertwined: not only did physicians rely on foodstuffs to aid patients, but cooks — working with physicians — incorporated medical theory into their cooking practices. For this session Mens et Mensa seeks papers that explore practical, medical and theological/moral/pastoral uses, interpretations and representations of food and the ideas, practices or artifacts associated with food, as a help or hindrance to bodily or spiritual health in the Middle Ages (500 – 1500 CE). Topics that are of interest include, but are not limited to, food and heresy, religious fasting, relationship between food and medicine in cookbooks, herbals, trades on the border between food and medicine (e.g., spicers and grocers), foods that might injure one’s bodily or spiritual health, the relationship between bodily health and spiritual health, the relationship between bodily health and good temperament and behavior.

Submit an abstract, CV and the completed Congress Participant Information Form (http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF)

by September 15, 2013, to:

John A. Bollweg
314 W. Traube Avenue
Westmont, IL 60559

E-mail: admin@mensetmensa.org
Phone: 630-390-6172