Archive for May, 2013

Critical Cluster on Ekphrasis

Friday, May 31st, 2013

Call for Papers

La corónica invites scholars to submit a paper for a cluster entitled “Seeing through Words: Ekphrasis in Medieval Iberian Literature.” Ekphrasis is broadly defined as a vivid description designed to make readers and listeners “see” the described object, person, or place as if it were before the eyes. Murray Krieger remarked that ekphrasis is at once a “miracle” and a “mirage” in which words and vision are intimately and impossibly united (Ekphrasis, The Illusion of the Natural Sign, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992). This cluster will explore the use of ekphrasis as a point of entry for thinking about the orality, textuality, and materiality of medieval literature.

✦ ✦ ✦

Those intending to submit articles should send an abstract and preliminary bibliography to the guest editors of the cluster, Martha Daas (mdaas@odu.edu) and Emily C. Francomano (ecf5@georgetown.edu) by December 1, 2013. Articles must be prepared according to La corónica’s guidelines and submitted to the guest editors by June 1, 2014.
FacebookTwitterGoogle+PocketPrintShare

Critical Cluster in memory of María Rosa Menocal (1953-2012)

Friday, May 31st, 2013

Call for Papers

The writing and teaching of María Rosa Menocal spanned over thirty years and had a definitive influence on the field of Hispanomedieval studies. In honor of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the publication of Menocal’s first book, The Arabic Role in Medieval Literary History (UPenn, 1987), La corónica is planning a critical cluster of essays by María Rosa’s former students, colleagues, friends, and critics. The editors welcome submissions on any aspect of Mediterranean culture, history, or literature in the Middle Ages and/or early modern periods. Especially welcome are articles that engage with María Rosa’s work and legacy or that analyze topics or areas of cultural production on which she wrote: Troubadour lyric poetry and song, kharja and muwashshaḥ studies, Dante, the history of Toledo, the interpenetration of Jewish, Muslim, and Christian cultures in Castilian literature and architecture, the meaning of mudéjar style, twelfth-century Hebrew poetry, frame tales and thirteenth-century translation from Arabic to Castilian, Alfonso X, the history of philology and medieval studies, the legacy of Américo Castro, the role of the humanities in Academy, etc. The editors aim to compile a volume that serves as both an exploration of María Rosa’s methodology and interests as well a tribute to her deep impact on the fields in which she worked.San Román

✦ ✦ ✦

Those interested should indicate their intention to submit (preferably including a topic and/or tentative abstract) to one of the guest editors as soon as possible. Final submissions (as Word documents, following La corónica’s guidelines, as explained at www.lacoronica.org/normas.htm as well as all other inquiries should be sent to either Lourdes Alvarez (lalvarez@newhaven.edu) or Ryan Szpiech (szpiech@umich.edu) by January 1, 2014.

2013 La corónica International Book Award

Thursday, May 16th, 2013

Vargas, Taming Winner of the 2013 La corónica International Book Award

Michael Vargas

Michael Vargas is Associate Professor of Medieval History at the State University of New York at New Paltz. He teaches courses encompassing many aspect of medieval Iberian society including Medieval Spains, Kings and Kingdoms, Inquisition, Medieval Traveler, and Jihad and Crusade.

Taming a Brood of Vipers: Conflict and Change in Fourteenth-Century Dominican Convents (Brill, 2011) draws from a rich trove of administrative records from the Province of Aragon of the Order of Friars Preachers. It shows mendicant friars in northeastern Iberia engaged in an internal fight over the meanings and functions of their lived religious experience. Dominican convents were complex communities (homes, schools, and workplaces all at once) that encouraged conflict while idealizing the quest for cooperation. While the boozing and womanizing of the Order’s undisciplined friars in the fourteenth century is legendary,  the bad-boy friar stereotype does not adequately explain a range of behaviors that badly fit our assumptions about those who promised themselves to a religious profession.  Vargas accepts that the Order suffered from the cataclysms of the period – economic disruption, war, plague, and schism – but older histories asserting that the friars were contaminated by factors beyond their control cover the truth in moralizing whitewash. Evidence of demographic, administrative, and attitude changes inside the Order suggests a slow intrusion of conflicted identities and competing loyalties. By the fourteenth century there were plenty of good reasons to confront the demands of an organization growing increasingly bureaucratic and legalistic.